Archive for September, 2012

Trends in State-Funded Public University Research

Posted by cdj On September - 26 - 2012

The National Science Board, the governing body for the U.S. National Science Foundation and independent advisors to Congress and to the President just released –Diminishing Funding and Rising Expectations: Trends and Challenges for Public Research Universities– as a policy companion report to Science and Engineering Indicators 2012, the biennial report that provides a quantitative information on the U.S. and international science and engineering enterprise. Deep state cuts over the last decade in per student state appropriations at major public research universities in the USA contributed to increases in tuition and fees that have outpaced both inflation and the comparable increases at private universities. The new report also warns of a widening gap between public and private research universities in key areas. From 1999 to 2009, instructional spending per full-time student increased by 9.9 percent, to $9,986, at public research institutions, while it grew by 24.5 percent, to $20,232, at private institutions. And faculty salaries, already higher at private institutions, grew three times faster at private research universities than at public research universities over the last decade. Public research universities perform more than 60 percent of the academic science and engineering R&D funded by the federal government. Of the 25 universities with the highest academic R&D expenditures in 2009, 17 were public institutions. The top ten states that had the largest per-student state funding cuts for their major public research universities were:

State (#universities) % change in per student state funding, 2002-2010 Per student state funding, 2010 % increase in enrollment, 2002-10
Colorado (2) -48% $3,417 6%
Rhode Island (1) -47% $3,692 15%
South Carolina (2) -38% $6,565 19%
Illinois (3) -37% $7,566 6%
Georgia (3) -37% $8,447 16%
Virginia (5) -34% $4,987 19%
Oregon (2) -32% $4,331 20%
Michigan (3) -31% $6,889 6%
West Virginia (1) -30% $7,231 27%
California (9) -30% $11,228 14%

Seven states did not cut per-student funding for their major public research universities between 2002 and 2010. New York and Wyoming increased funding per student 72 percent and 62 percent, respectively, and Wyoming led the nation in 2010 in funding per student at $16,986 for its single major public research university.

C-SMIP12, October 2012

Posted by cdj On September - 17 - 2012

The California Strong Motion Instrumentation Program (CSMIP) in the California Geological Survey has scheduled its C-SMIP12 Seminar on Utilization of Strong Motion Data for Tuesday, October 2, 2012 in Sacramento, California. CSMIP holds this annual seminar to report recent research findings on strong-motion data to practicing seismic design professionals, earth scientists and post-earthquake response personnel. The purpose of the annual seminar is to provide information that will be useful immediately in seismic design practice and post-earthquake response, and in the longer term, in the improvement of seismic design codes and practices with particular application to the State of California. The website provides registration information (cost is $50.00 per person), the preliminary one day program, and access to annual seminar proceedings since 1989.

Recent Studies from the Maule, Chile earthquake of 2010

Posted by cdj On September - 14 - 2012

Earthquake Spectra

EERI released a Special Issue of Earthquake Spectra on the Maule, Chile earthquake (February 27, 2010) containing English language investigations of seismological and engineering aspects of the large earthquake. Universidad de Chile, Departamento de Ingenieria Civil published a report: Mw=8.8 Terremoto en Chile providing Spanish language studies of aspects of the destructive earthquake and tsunami.

Terremoto en Chile
Universidad de Chile, Departamento de Ingenieria Civil

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